Art Basel OVR:20c 

Judith Bernstein & William N. Copley

October 28, 2020 — October 31, 2020

Press Release

新闻通讯

新聞通訊

Kasmin is delighted to participate in Art Basel OVR:20c, an online viewing room dedicated to works made between 1900–1999, accessible from October 28–31, 2020.

The presentation brings together two artists, Judith Bernstein and William N. Copley, whose irreverence, social and political satire, and appetite for the transgressive inform paintings and works on paper that span from 1963–1995. Marshaling distinct visual languages to playfully query propriety and patriotism, the resulting works are filled with a riotous energy that remains as urgent today as when the works were made.

Additionally, the viewing room includes a photographic project documenting the works as they are inserted into everyday life in locations spanning Manhattan, where both artists spent the majority of their working lives (Copley from 1963 to 1991, and Bernstein since 1967). The concept draws on Copley’s tendency to have his works photographed on an easel, framed so as to purposefully include a wider visual context. In an essay on the subject in 2014, Kasmin’s Nick Olney wrote, “Like a time capsule, each image becomes a window into a lost moment in time.” In appropriating this format, the supplementary presentation reiterates the objecthood of the artworks, bringing them off the screen, out of the white cube, and into contemporary life.

William N. Copley and Judith Bernstein met in 1968 through Copley’s dealer in New York, Alexander Iolas. Copley became a mentor figure for Bernstein, assisting with introductions that led to a solo exhibition at Brooks Jackson Iolas. Later, in 1977, Copley commissioned Bernstein for site-specific screw drawings in the interior of his apartment on 89th Street in New York, rendered in the same charcoal medium as the works in the presentation.

Bernstein’s explosive gestural charcoal strokes spell “Liberty,” “Justice,” “Equality,” “Truth,” “Fear,” “Evil,” “Courage,” “Dream”, and “Freedom.” This medium has been important for Bernstein, who surged into art world prominence in the early 1970s with her monumental charcoal drawings of penis-screw hybrids; early incarnations of which were exhibited at AIR Gallery; Brooks Jackson Iolas Gallery, New York; Brooklyn Museum; and MoMA P.S. 1, among other institutions. Five of these works were included in the 2017-18 exhibition Judith Bernstein: Cabinet of Horrors, staged at The Drawing Center, New York.

Copley’s work teases the conceits associated with bourgeois morality and the dogmatic aspects of American patriotism. Two exhibitions titled The Patriotism of CPLY and All That have been staged at Alexander Iolas Gallery (1976) and Kasmin (2012), exploring the artist’s interest in political symbolism. Included in this presentation are two works from 1982, It’s Always Raining in Chicago (also known as July 5th) and Untitled, that utilize Copley’s iconic suited man among characteristically layered, dreamlike compositions. Also represented are examples of Copley’s “Nouns” and “X-Rated” paintings, both of which translate an interest in erotic subject matter into playful paintings marked by their bold contour lines and lyrical color palettes.

A complementary viewing room on our website will go live on October 30, including an expanded selection of artworks.

To register with Art Basel for access to the online viewing rooms, please visit this link.

For more information, please contact info@kasmingallery.com.

Kasmin is delighted to participate in Art Basel OVR:20c, an online viewing room dedicated to works made between 1900–1999, accessible from October 28–31, 2020.

The presentation brings together two artists, Judith Bernstein and William N. Copley, whose irreverence, social and political satire, and appetite for the transgressive inform paintings and works on paper that span from 1963–1995. Marshaling distinct visual languages to playfully query propriety and patriotism, the resulting works are filled with a riotous energy that remains as urgent today as when the works were made.

Additionally, the viewing room includes a photographic project documenting the works as they are inserted into everyday life in locations spanning Manhattan, where both artists spent the majority of their working lives (Copley from 1963 to 1991, and Bernstein since 1967). The concept draws on Copley’s tendency to have his works photographed on an easel, framed so as to purposefully include a wider visual context. In an essay on the subject in 2014, Kasmin’s Nick Olney wrote, “Like a time capsule, each image becomes a window into a lost moment in time.” In appropriating this format, the supplementary presentation reiterates the objecthood of the artworks, bringing them off the screen, out of the white cube, and into contemporary life.

William N. Copley and Judith Bernstein met in 1968 through Copley’s dealer in New York, Alexander Iolas. Copley became a mentor figure for Bernstein, assisting with introductions that led to a solo exhibition at Brooks Jackson Iolas. Later, in 1977, Copley commissioned Bernstein for site-specific screw drawings in the interior of his apartment on 89th Street in New York, rendered in the same charcoal medium as the works in the presentation.

Bernstein’s explosive gestural charcoal strokes spell “Liberty,” “Justice,” “Equality,” “Truth,” “Fear,” “Evil,” “Courage,” “Dream”, and “Freedom.” This medium has been important for Bernstein, who surged into art world prominence in the early 1970s with her monumental charcoal drawings of penis-screw hybrids; early incarnations of which were exhibited at AIR Gallery; Brooks Jackson Iolas Gallery, New York; Brooklyn Museum; and MoMA P.S. 1, among other institutions. Five of these works were included in the 2017-18 exhibition Judith Bernstein: Cabinet of Horrors, staged at The Drawing Center, New York.

Copley’s work teases the conceits associated with bourgeois morality and the dogmatic aspects of American patriotism. Two exhibitions titled The Patriotism of CPLY and All That have been staged at Alexander Iolas Gallery (1976) and Kasmin (2012), exploring the artist’s interest in political symbolism. Included in this presentation are two works from 1982, It’s Always Raining in Chicago (also known as July 5th) and Untitled, that utilize Copley’s iconic suited man among characteristically layered, dreamlike compositions. Also represented are examples of Copley’s “Nouns” and “X-Rated” paintings, both of which translate an interest in erotic subject matter into playful paintings marked by their bold contour lines and lyrical color palettes.

A complementary viewing room on our website will go live on October 30, including an expanded selection of artworks.

To register with Art Basel for access to the online viewing rooms, please visit this link.

For more information, please contact info@kasmingallery.com.

Kasmin is delighted to participate in Art Basel OVR:20c, an online viewing room dedicated to works made between 1900–1999, accessible from October 28–31, 2020.

The presentation brings together two artists, Judith Bernstein and William N. Copley, whose irreverence, social and political satire, and appetite for the transgressive inform paintings and works on paper that span from 1963–1995. Marshaling distinct visual languages to playfully query propriety and patriotism, the resulting works are filled with a riotous energy that remains as urgent today as when the works were made.

Additionally, the viewing room includes a photographic project documenting the works as they are inserted into everyday life in locations spanning Manhattan, where both artists spent the majority of their working lives (Copley from 1963 to 1991, and Bernstein since 1967). The concept draws on Copley’s tendency to have his works photographed on an easel, framed so as to purposefully include a wider visual context. In an essay on the subject in 2014, Kasmin’s Nick Olney wrote, “Like a time capsule, each image becomes a window into a lost moment in time.” In appropriating this format, the supplementary presentation reiterates the objecthood of the artworks, bringing them off the screen, out of the white cube, and into contemporary life.

William N. Copley and Judith Bernstein met in 1968 through Copley’s dealer in New York, Alexander Iolas. Copley became a mentor figure for Bernstein, assisting with introductions that led to a solo exhibition at Brooks Jackson Iolas. Later, in 1977, Copley commissioned Bernstein for site-specific screw drawings in the interior of his apartment on 89th Street in New York, rendered in the same charcoal medium as the works in the presentation.

Bernstein’s explosive gestural charcoal strokes spell “Liberty,” “Justice,” “Equality,” “Truth,” “Fear,” “Evil,” “Courage,” “Dream”, and “Freedom.” This medium has been important for Bernstein, who surged into art world prominence in the early 1970s with her monumental charcoal drawings of penis-screw hybrids; early incarnations of which were exhibited at AIR Gallery; Brooks Jackson Iolas Gallery, New York; Brooklyn Museum; and MoMA P.S. 1, among other institutions. Five of these works were included in the 2017-18 exhibition Judith Bernstein: Cabinet of Horrors, staged at The Drawing Center, New York.

Copley’s work teases the conceits associated with bourgeois morality and the dogmatic aspects of American patriotism. Two exhibitions titled The Patriotism of CPLY and All That have been staged at Alexander Iolas Gallery (1976) and Kasmin (2012), exploring the artist’s interest in political symbolism. Included in this presentation are two works from 1982, It’s Always Raining in Chicago (also known as July 5th) and Untitled, that utilize Copley’s iconic suited man among characteristically layered, dreamlike compositions. Also represented are examples of Copley’s “Nouns” and “X-Rated” paintings, both of which translate an interest in erotic subject matter into playful paintings marked by their bold contour lines and lyrical color palettes.

A complementary viewing room on our website will go live on October 30, including an expanded selection of artworks.

To register with Art Basel for access to the online viewing rooms, please visit this link.

For more information, please contact info@kasmingallery.com.

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