Frieze Masters Viewing Room

October 09, 2020 — October 16, 2020

Press Release

新闻通讯

新聞通訊

Kasmin is pleased to announce “Copley’s Circle,” an online presentation staged as part of Frieze Masters Viewing Room from October 9–16, 2020 (Preview Days: October 7–8).

Celebrating the formidable influence of artist, dealer, and patron, William N. Copley (1919–1996), this grouping brings together works by artists who were collaborators, confidants, included in exhibitions organized by Copley, collected by Copley, or championed by him through critical texts and grants. These include Richard Artschwager, Judith Bernstein, Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Leonor Fini, Richard Hamilton, Ray Johnson, Les Lalanne, Roy Lichtenstein, Man Ray, Jim Nutt, Ed Ruscha, Peter Saul, Dorothea Tanning, Andy Warhol, and H.C. Westermann.

In 1948, Copley opened Copley Galleries in Beverly Hills. Though the gallery mounted just six shows, it signaled the pivotal role Copley would play in creating a link between the European avant-garde and post-war art in America. While Copley’s career is often associated with Surrealism, his network transcended many significant 20th century movements. Occupying a studio in the famed Impasse Ronsin after WWII, Copley’s circle grew to include Modernists and Dadaists, as well as notable artists who also held ateliers there, such as Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne. Upon his return to New York in 1963, Copley anticipated Pop art’s efficacy through friendships with Roy Lichtenstein, H.C. Westermann and Andy Warhol; and became a proponent of a younger generation that included figures such as Peter Saul and Judith Bernstein.

Copley's own work is held in private and public collections worldwide, such as the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, and many more. Recently the subject of a comprehensive traveling retrospective organized by The Menil Collection (2016) and Fondazione Prada (2017), Copley is now seen as a singular personage of post-war painting and an important linkage between European Surrealism and American Pop art. The New York Years, a major exhibition of over 20 paintings made in the city between 1963–1986, was staged at Kasmin in New York from March 11–September 26, 2020.

For more information, please contact info@kasmingallery.com.
For press requests, please contact press@kasmingallery.com.

Image: William N. Copley, Homage à Man Ray, 1950, oil on linen, 20 x 16 inches, 50.8 x 40.6 cm.  © 2020 William N. Copley Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Kasmin is pleased to announce “Copley’s Circle,” an online presentation staged as part of Frieze Masters Viewing Room from October 9–16, 2020 (Preview Days: October 7–8).

Celebrating the formidable influence of artist, dealer, and patron, William N. Copley (1919–1996), this grouping brings together works by artists who were collaborators, confidants, included in exhibitions organized by Copley, collected by Copley, or championed by him through critical texts and grants. These include Richard Artschwager, Judith Bernstein, Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Leonor Fini, Richard Hamilton, Ray Johnson, Les Lalanne, Roy Lichtenstein, Man Ray, Jim Nutt, Ed Ruscha, Peter Saul, Dorothea Tanning, Andy Warhol, and H.C. Westermann.

In 1948, Copley opened Copley Galleries in Beverly Hills. Though the gallery mounted just six shows, it signaled the pivotal role Copley would play in creating a link between the European avant-garde and post-war art in America. While Copley’s career is often associated with Surrealism, his network transcended many significant 20th century movements. Occupying a studio in the famed Impasse Ronsin after WWII, Copley’s circle grew to include Modernists and Dadaists, as well as notable artists who also held ateliers there, such as Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne. Upon his return to New York in 1963, Copley anticipated Pop art’s efficacy through friendships with Roy Lichtenstein, H.C. Westermann and Andy Warhol; and became a proponent of a younger generation that included figures such as Peter Saul and Judith Bernstein.

Copley's own work is held in private and public collections worldwide, such as the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, and many more. Recently the subject of a comprehensive traveling retrospective organized by The Menil Collection (2016) and Fondazione Prada (2017), Copley is now seen as a singular personage of post-war painting and an important linkage between European Surrealism and American Pop art. The New York Years, a major exhibition of over 20 paintings made in the city between 1963–1986, was staged at Kasmin in New York from March 11–September 26, 2020.

For more information, please contact info@kasmingallery.com.
For press requests, please contact press@kasmingallery.com.

Image: William N. Copley, Homage à Man Ray, 1950, oil on linen, 20 x 16 inches, 50.8 x 40.6 cm.  © 2020 William N. Copley Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Kasmin is pleased to announce “Copley’s Circle,” an online presentation staged as part of Frieze Masters Viewing Room from October 9–16, 2020 (Preview Days: October 7–8).

Celebrating the formidable influence of artist, dealer, and patron, William N. Copley (1919–1996), this grouping brings together works by artists who were collaborators, confidants, included in exhibitions organized by Copley, collected by Copley, or championed by him through critical texts and grants. These include Richard Artschwager, Judith Bernstein, Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Leonor Fini, Richard Hamilton, Ray Johnson, Les Lalanne, Roy Lichtenstein, Man Ray, Jim Nutt, Ed Ruscha, Peter Saul, Dorothea Tanning, Andy Warhol, and H.C. Westermann.

In 1948, Copley opened Copley Galleries in Beverly Hills. Though the gallery mounted just six shows, it signaled the pivotal role Copley would play in creating a link between the European avant-garde and post-war art in America. While Copley’s career is often associated with Surrealism, his network transcended many significant 20th century movements. Occupying a studio in the famed Impasse Ronsin after WWII, Copley’s circle grew to include Modernists and Dadaists, as well as notable artists who also held ateliers there, such as Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne. Upon his return to New York in 1963, Copley anticipated Pop art’s efficacy through friendships with Roy Lichtenstein, H.C. Westermann and Andy Warhol; and became a proponent of a younger generation that included figures such as Peter Saul and Judith Bernstein.

Copley's own work is held in private and public collections worldwide, such as the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, and many more. Recently the subject of a comprehensive traveling retrospective organized by The Menil Collection (2016) and Fondazione Prada (2017), Copley is now seen as a singular personage of post-war painting and an important linkage between European Surrealism and American Pop art. The New York Years, a major exhibition of over 20 paintings made in the city between 1963–1986, was staged at Kasmin in New York from March 11–September 26, 2020.

For more information, please contact info@kasmingallery.com.
For press requests, please contact press@kasmingallery.com.

Image: William N. Copley, Homage à Man Ray, 1950, oil on linen, 20 x 16 inches, 50.8 x 40.6 cm.  © 2020 William N. Copley Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

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